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How to select the right shape and size of the tip for micro soldering

The tip shape is one critical factor for soldering as it can make a big difference in soldering performance.

You can learn how to select the right shape/size of a soldering tip from the examples of soldering electronic components.

There are various shapes and sizes in soldering tips.

1. Basics of soldering tip selection

Consider the thermal capacity of the P.W.B. and the electric components (size and shape).
It is important to select the soldering tip with enough thermal mass for the boards and components, and a wide contact area to effectively transfer the heat to the soldering point.
Consider the size and shape of the P.W.B. and components for their thermal mass carefully, and select the soldering tip that fits with them well.
Be sure not to select the tip that is too big for the land diameter.


If the tip is big or thick, the heat transfers efficiently.
The more contact area it gets, the more efficiently the heat transfers.

If the tip is too small or too thin, the heat does not transfer effectively.
The less contact area it gets, the less effectively heat transfers.
If the tip is too big or too thick, it may damage the land.

If the tip is bigger than the land, it may damage the land by overheating.

2. Narrow down the tip shape and size

Next, you need to narrow down tip shape and size for suitability to your work.

It is important to understand soldering conditions such as "soldering space is very narrow,"
"there is a tall component next to soldering area", and "a component with a high tendency to occur solder bridging", in selecting the right tip.

The narrow space with adjacent components
A tall component next to the soldering components
A high tendency to occur solder bridging

The charasteristics of each tip shape

3. Select the soldering tip which you feel comfortable using

After narrowing down the tip shape and size considering the thermal capacity of the P.W.B. and the electric components (size and shape), finally, select the one that you think or feel comfortable using.

If you tend to have soldering defective often with the tip you selected, you may need to reselect the tip from the beginning or review the soldering unit.
  • Please contact us or your local distributor/dealer,If you have any problem selecting soldering units or tips.

Feature of each tip shape


Shape B

Shape B has a conical tip end like a pencil.
It is useful for various works by using different areas of the tip surface.

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Shape B

Shape I

Shape I has a conical tip end like Shape B but quite thinner.
It is suitable for soldering fine components and in narrow spaces.

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Shape I

Shape J

Shape J is the bent type of Shape I.
Shape J tips are good for drag soldering with the bent area as well as for soldering in the narrow spaces with the tip end only.

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Shape J

Shape D

Shape D is similar to a flathead screwdriver.
It has a wider contact area than Shape B, and so it is suitable for soldering chip components and drag soldering.

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Shape D

Shape BC/C

Shape BC/C are like a conical/cylindorical shaft with a diagonal cut.
The main feature is its thickness for great thermal mass, and the cut surface is ideal for soldering.

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Shape BC/C

Shape BCF/CF

Shape BCF/CF are similar to Shape BC/B but are tinned on the cut surface only.
As the solder does not come up to the tip side, they are more useful than BC/C when soldering with adjacent components.

Difference between BC/C and BCF/CF Close the difference between BC/C and BCF/CF

Shape BCF/CF
Solder plating on cut surface (yellow part) only

Shape BCM/CM

Shape BCM/CM are similar to Shape BC/C in shape but have a dent on the cut surface.
They are suitable for drag soldering because the surface tension of solder in the dent helps prevent solder bridging.

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Shape BCM/CM

Shape K

Shape K is similar to a knife blade.
It is good for drag soldering if laying down the knife blade, and it is good for soldering tiny components in the narrow spaces if standing the blade straight.

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Shape K

With Concave

Soldering tip with concave on the top.
It heats the land and the through-hole component leads effectively by making a bigger contact area with the concave.
It is effective to avoid insufficient PTH fill.

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With Concave